Death Penalty Database

Jordan

Information current as of: June 28, 2013

General

Official Country Name

Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan (Jordan). [1]

Geographical Region

Asia (Western Asia). [2]

Death Penalty Law Status

Retentionist. The last execution in Jordan took place in 2015. [3]

Methods of Execution

Hanging. [4]

Comments.
Shooting was also previously used as a method of execution, but two recent reports suggest that hanging is now the sole method of execution, although no executions have taken place since 2006. [5]

References

[1] U.S. Dept. of State, Background Note: Jordan, http://www.state.gov/outofdate/bgn/jordan/192420.htm, Dec. 30, 2011.
[2] U.N., Composition of macro geographical (continental) regions, geographical sub-regions, and selected economic and other groupings, http://unstats.un.org/unsd/methods/m49/m49regin.htm, Sep. 20, 2011.
[3] Omar Akour & Karin Laub, Jordan executes 2 al-Qaida prisoners after IS kills pilot, Associated Press, http://news.yahoo.com/purported-video-shows-jordan-pilot-burned-death-171738881.html, Feb. 4, 2015. The Guardian, Jordan executes female would-be suicide bomber wanted for release by Isis, http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/04/jordan-executes-female-would-be-suicide-bomber-wanted-for-release-by-isis, Feb. 3, 2015.
[4] Jordan Penal Code, art. 17, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[5] Amman Center for Human Rights Studies, ACHRS 6th Annual Report: The Death Penalty in the Arab World, Jordan, p. 17, http://www.achrs.org/english/images/stories/news/pdf/Death%20Penalty%20Report%202011.pdf, 2011; Amman Center for Human Rights Studies, ACHRS 5th Annual Report: The Death Penalty in the Arab World, Jordan, p. 19, http://www.achrs.org/english/images/stories/news/pdf/Death%20Penalty%20Report%202010.pdf, 2010.

Country Details

Language(s)

Arabic. [1]

Population

6,510,000. (2011 census). [2]

Number of Individuals Currently Under Sentence of Death

As of February 2013, there are at least 106 individuals on death row, including 9 women. [3] Amnesty International reports indicate that an estimated total of 67 individuals were sentenced to death from 2007 to 2011. [4] Twenty-six people were sentenced to death between April 2012 and February 2013, including 3 since the beginning of 2013. [5]

Annual Number of Reported Executions

Executions in 2017 to date (last updated on December 6, 2017)

In March 2017, a mass execution of 15 people was carried out. [6] Of the 15 executed, 10 had been charged with terrorism offenses.

Executions in 2016

0. [7]

Per capita execution rate in 2016

Executions in 2015

2. [8]

Per capita execution rate in 2015

1 execution per 3,255,000 persons

Executions in 2014

11. [9]

Per capita execution rate in 2014

1 execution per 591,818 persons

Executions in 2013

0. [10]

Per capita execution rate in 2013

0 executions

Executions in 2012

0. [11]

Per capita execution rate in 2012

0 executions

Executions in 2011

0. [12]

Per capita execution rate in 2011

0 executions

Executions in 2010

0. [13]

Executions in 2009

0. [14]

Executions in 2008

0. [15]

Executions in 2007

0. [16]

Year of Last Known Execution

2017. [17]

References

[1] U.S. Dept. of State, Background Note: Jordan, http://www.state.gov/outofdate/bgn/jordan/192420.htm, Dec. 30, 2011.
[2] U.S. Dept. of State, Background Note: Jordan, http://www.state.gov/outofdate/bgn/jordan/192420.htm, Dec. 30, 2011.
[3] Haitham Shibli, affiliated with Penal Reform International Middle East and North Africa, e-mail to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 27, 2013.
[4] The Guardian, Data Blog: Death Penalty Statistics, Data Summary—Jordan, http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2011/mar/29/death-penalty-countries-world#data, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[5] Haitham Shibli, affiliated with Penal Reform International Middle East and North Africa, e-mail to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 27, 2013.
[6] The Guardian, Jordan: 15 executions ‘shocking’ says human rights group, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/05/jordan-15-executions-shocking-says-human-rights-group, Mar. 4, 2017.
[7] Amnesty International, Death sentences and executions in 2016, ACT 50/5740/2017, Apr. 11, 2017.
[8] Omar Akour & Karin Laub, Jordan executes 2 al-Qaida prisoners after IS kills pilot, Associated Press, http://news.yahoo.com/purported-video-shows-jordan-pilot-burned-death-171738881.html, Feb. 4, 2015. The Guardian, Jordan executes female would-be suicide bomber wanted for release by Isis, http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/04/jordan-executes-female-would-be-suicide-bomber-wanted-for-release-by-isis, Feb. 3, 2015.
[9] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2014, ACT 50/001/2015, Mar. 31, 2015. AFP, Jordan hangs 11 men after eight-year halt to death penalty, The Guardian, http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/dec/21/jordan-hangs-11-men-death-penalty, Dec. 21, 2014.
[10] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2013, ACT 50/001/2014, Mar. 26, 2014.
[11] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2012, ACT 50/001/2012, Apr. 9, 2013.
[12] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2011, p. 33, ACT 50/001/2012, Mar. 30, 2012.
[13] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2010, p. 26, ACT 50/001/2011, Mar. 30, 2011.
[14] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2009, p. 6, ACT 50/001/2010, Mar. 30, 2010.
[15] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2008, p. 8, ACT 50/003/2009, Mar. 30, 2009.
[16] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2007, p. 7, ACT 50/001/2008, Apr. 15, 2008.
[17] The Guardian, Jordan: 15 executions ‘shocking’ says human rights group, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/05/jordan-15-executions-shocking-says-human-rights-group, Mar. 4, 2017.

Crimes and Offenders Punishable By Death

Crimes Punishable by Death

Aggravated Murder.
Murder committed in the commission of a felony and the murder of an ancestor are punishable by death. [1] The death penalty also applies if the offender commits murder or acts of torture during the commission of a highway robbery or assault along a public road or in the countryside. [2]

Murder.
Under the Jordanian Penal Code, anyone who kills a person ‘willfully’ (Arabic: “qasdan,” meaning “intentionally, purposefully, advisedly”) is punished with 15 years of hard labor. [3] However, anyone who kills a person with premeditation (Arabic: “al-israr al-sabq” meaning “premeditated persistence, perseverance, insistence”) is punished with death. [4]

Terrorism-Related Offenses Resulting in Death. [5]

Terrorism-Related Offenses Not Resulting in Death.
If the terrorist act uses explosives; radioactive materials; chemical, biological, or radioactive weapons; or if it destroys or partially destroys a building in which one or more people are present, the offense is punishable by death. [6]

Rape of Child Not Resulting in Death.
If the victim is a girl under the age of 15, the offense is punishable by death. [7]

Robbery Not Resulting in Death.
Aggravated highway robbery, i.e. committed with acts of torture or other barbaric acts during the commission of the crime, is punishable by death. [8]

Drug Trafficking Not Resulting in Death.
General drug trafficking offenses and dealing or dispensing drugs in conjunction with arms smuggling or money laundering/counterfeiting are punishable by death. [9]

Treason. [10]
Making an attempt on the life of the King, Queen, or Regent and working unlawfully to change the Constitution are punishable by death as “crimes against the constitution.” [11] Pursuant to the Law on the Protection of State Secrets and Documents, if the intended recipient of classified information is an enemy foreign state, the offense is punishable by death. [12] Under article 14 of the State Secrets Law, if anyone has entered a restricted access place or attempted to enter such a place for the purpose(s) of accessing secrets, items, protected documents or confidential information which must remain secret for the state’s security and the recipient is an enemy foreign state, the person shall be sentenced to death. [13] Article 15(b) states that “anyone who steals classified information for the benefit of an enemy foreign state shall be sentenced to death.” [14] Article 16(b) notes that “anyone who disclosed protected information through his position in a Department to an enemy foreign state shall be sentenced to death.” [15]

Espionage. [16]

War crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.
Under Articles 41 and 42 of the Military Criminal Code, people who participate or incite others to participate in war crimes relating to arrest, detention, torture and inhumane treatment may be sentenced to death. [17]

Other Offenses Not Resulting in Death.
Article 11(c) of the Jordanian Firearms and Ammunitions Law states that “anyone who manufactured, imported, acquired, transferred, sold, bought or was an intermediary in buying or selling any gun or automatic weapon without a license (warrant), with the intention of using it illicitly, may be punished by death and the weapon shall be forfeit.” [18]

Comments.
2010 amendments to the Jordanian Penal Code eliminated the death penalty for arson and for crimes against the constitutional authorities through armed rebellion, further reducing the number of death eligible crimes in the country. [19]

Does the country have a mandatory death penalty?

Yes. [20]

For Which Offenses, If Any, Is a Mandatory Death Sentence Imposed?

Drug Trafficking Not Resulting in Death. [21]

War crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.
It is unclear whether inciting others to participate in war crimes carries a mandatory death sentence. [22]

Crimes For Which Individuals Have Been Executed Since January 2008:

There have been no reported executions since 2006. [23]

Categories of Offenders Excluded From the Death Penalty:

Individuals Below Age 18 At Time of Crime. [24]

Pregnant Women. [25]
Although women cannot be executed while pregnant, Jordan’s Penal Code (1960) and its Code of Criminal Procedure (1961) seem to be at odds as to the extent of the exclusion: Article 17 of the Penal Code states that a pregnant woman’s sentence will be commuted to hard labor, while the Code of Criminal Procedure says that a pregnant woman sentenced to death may be executed three months after the birth of her child. [26]

Mentally Ill. [27]
Article 92 of the Penal Code states generally that a person who does not recognize the nature or illegality of his acts because of a mental disorder will not be punished, but will be confined to a mental institution until he no longer represents a danger to public safety. [28] Article 29 states that the death penalty shall be suspended in the case of a mentally incapacitated person; however, if a medical committee determines that he has regained sanity, he may be executed. [29]

Intellectually Disabled.
Article 92 of the Penal Code states generally that a person who does not recognize the nature or illegality of his acts because of a mental disorder will not be punished, but will be confined to a mental institution until he no longer represents a danger to public safety. [30]

References

[1] Jordan Penal Code, art. 328, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[2] Jordan Penal Code, art. 158, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[3] Jordan Penal Code, art. 326, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[4] Jordan Penal Code, arts. 328, 329, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[5] Jordan Penal Code, art. 148(4)(a), Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[6] Jordan Penal Code, art. 148(4)(b&c), Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[7] Jordan Penal Code, art. 292(2), Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[8] Jordan Penal Code, art. 158, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[9] Jordan Law on Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, art. 10, Law No. 11 of 1988, 1988.
[10] Jordan Penal Code, arts. 110-113, 142, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[11] Jordan Penal Code, arts. 135, 136, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[12] Article 19, Memorandum on Jordan’s Protection of State Secrets and Documents Provisional Law No. (50), LAW/2005/1205, Dec. 31, 2005.
[13] Jordan Law on the Protection of State Secrets and Documents, art. 14, Law No.50 of 1971, 1971.
[14] Jordan Law on the Protection of State Secrets and Documents, art. 15(b), Law No.50 of 1971, 1971.
[15] Jordan Law on the Protection of State Secrets and Documents, art. 16(b), Law No.50 of 1971, 1971.
[16] Jordan Penal Code, arts. 124-126, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[17] Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Submission to the U.N. Committee Against Torture for its Consideration of the 2nd Periodic Report of Jordan, p. 17, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cat/docs/ngos/RCT_Jordan44.pdf, Apr. 2010.
[18] Jordan Firearms and Ammunitions Law, art. 11(c), Law No. 34 of 1952, 1952;
[19] National Coordination Committee, General Command of the Jordanian Armed Forces, http://www.docstoc.com/docs/119736588/Translated-from-Arabic, Jan. 31, 2010.
[20] Jordan Penal Code, arts. 137(1), 372, Law No. 16 of 1960 amended by Provisional Law No. 12 for the year 2010, arts. 38, 99, 1960.
[21] Amnesty International, When the State Kills, p. 159, ACT 51/07/89, 1989; Jordan Penal Code, arts. 110-113, 124-126, 135-137, 142, 148, 158, 292, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960; Jordan Law on Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, art. 10, Law No. 11 of 1988, 1988.
[22] Jordan Law on Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, art. 10, Law No. 11 of 1988, 1988.
[23] Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Submission to the U.N. Committee Against Torture for its Consideration of the 2nd Periodic Report of Jordan, p. 17, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cat/docs/ngos/RCT_Jordan44.pdf, Apr. 2010.
[24] Caroline Sculier, Towards a Universal Moratorium on the Use of the Death Penalty, p. 20, World Coalition Against the Death Penalty, Feb. 2010.
[25] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 32, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/JOR/3, Mar. 30, 2009.
[26] Jordan Penal Code, art. 17, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[27] Jordan Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 358, Law No. 9 of 1961, 1961.
[28] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 32, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/JOR/3, Mar. 30, 2009.
[29] Jordan Penal Code, art. 92, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[30] Jordan Penal Code, art. 29, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[31] Jordan Penal Code, art. 92, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.

International Commitments

ICCPR

Party?

Yes. [1]

Date of Accession

May 28, 1975. [2]

Signed?

Yes. [3]

Date of Signature

Jun. 30, 1972. [4]

First Optional Protocol to the ICCPR, Recognizing Jurisdiction of the Human Rights Committee

Party?

No. [5]

Date of Accession

Not Applicable.

Signed?

No. [6]

Date of Signature

Not Applicable.

Second Optional Protocol to the ICCPR, Toward the Abolition of the Death Penalty

Party?

No. [7]

Date of Accession

Not Applicable.

Signed?

No. [8]

Date of Signature

Not Applicable.

American Convention on Human Rights

Party?

Not Applicable.

Date of Accession

Signed?

Not Applicable.

Date of Signature

Death Penalty Protocol to the ACHR

Party?

Not Applicable.

Date of Accession

Signed?

Not Applicable.

Date of Signature

African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights (ACHPR)

Party?

Not Applicable.

Date of Accession

Signed?

Not Applicable.

Date of Signature

Protocol to the ACHPR on the Rights of Women in Africa

Party?

Not Applicable.

Date of Accession

Signed?

Not Applicable.

Date of Signature

African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child

Party?

Not Applicable.

Date of Accession

Signed?

Not Applicable.

Date of Signature

Arab Charter on Human Rights

Party?

Yes. [9]

Date of Accession

October 28, 2004. [10]

Signed?

Yes. [11]

Date of Signature

October 28, 2004. [12]

2016 Record of Votes on the UN General Assembly Moratorium Resolution

Cosponsor

No. [13]

Vote

Abstained. [14]

Signed the Note Verbale of Dissociation

No. [15]

2014 Record of Votes on the UN General Assembly Moratorium Resolution

Cosponsor

No. [16]

Vote

Abstained. [17]

Signed the Note Verbale of Dissociation

No. [18]

2012 Record of Votes on the UN General Assembly Moratorium Resolution

Cosponsor

No. [19]

Vote

Abstained. [20]

Signed the Note Verbale of Dissociation

No. [21]

2010 Record of Votes on the UN General Assembly Moratorium Resolution

Cosponsor

No. [22]

Vote

Abstained. [23]

Signed the Note Verbale of Dissociation

No. [24]

2008 Record of Votes on the UN General Assembly Moratorium Resolution

Cosponsor

No. [25]

Vote

Abstained. [26]

Signed the Note Verbale of Dissociation

No. [27]

2007 Record of Votes on the UN General Assembly Moratorium Resolution

Cosponsor

No. [28]

Vote

Against. [29]

Signed the Note Verbale of Dissociation

Yes. [30]

References

[1] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, ICCPR, 999 U.N.T.S. 171, Dec. 16, 1966, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-4&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[2] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, ICCPR, 999 U.N.T.S. 171, Dec. 16, 1966, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-4&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[3] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, ICCPR, 999 U.N.T.S. 171, Dec. 16, 1966, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-4&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[4] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, ICCPR, 999 U.N.T.S. 171, Dec. 16, 1966, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-4&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[5] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, Optional Prot. to the ICCPR, 999 U.N.T.S. 171, Dec. 16, 1966, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-5&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[6] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, Optional Prot. to the ICCPR, 999 U.N.T.S. 171, Dec. 16, 1966, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-5&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[7] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, Second Optional Prot. to the ICCPR, Aiming at the Abolition of the Death Penalty, 1642 U.N.T.S. 414, Dec. 15, 1989, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-12&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[8] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, Second Optional Prot. to the ICCPR, Aiming at the Abolition of the Death Penalty, 1642 U.N.T.S. 414, Dec. 15, 1989, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-12&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[9] Arab League, Statement of Signatures and Ratifications of the Arab Charter of Human Rights, http://www.lasportal.org/wps/wcm/connect/498481804a04776ea1d7bd526698d42c/%D8%AC%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%AA%D8%B5%D8%AF%D9%8A%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%B9%D9%84%D9%89+%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%8A%D8%AB%D8%A7%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%A8%D9%8A+%D9%84%D8%AD%D9%82%D9%88%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A5%D9%86%D8%B3%D8%A7%D9%86.pdf?MOD=AJPERES (translated from Arabic by DPW), last accessed Apr. 7, 2014.
[10] Arab League, Statement of Signatures and Ratifications of the Arab Charter of Human Rights, http://www.lasportal.org/wps/wcm/connect/498481804a04776ea1d7bd526698d42c/%D8%AC%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%AA%D8%B5%D8%AF%D9%8A%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%B9%D9%84%D9%89+%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%8A%D8%AB%D8%A7%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%A8%D9%8A+%D9%84%D8%AD%D9%82%D9%88%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A5%D9%86%D8%B3%D8%A7%D9%86.pdf?MOD=AJPERES (translated from Arabic by DPW), last accessed Apr. 7, 2014.
[11] Arab League, Statement of Signatures and Ratifications of the Arab Charter of Human Rights, http://www.lasportal.org/wps/wcm/connect/498481804a04776ea1d7bd526698d42c/%D8%AC%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%AA%D8%B5%D8%AF%D9%8A%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%B9%D9%84%D9%89+%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%8A%D8%AB%D8%A7%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%A8%D9%8A+%D9%84%D8%AD%D9%82%D9%88%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A5%D9%86%D8%B3%D8%A7%D9%86.pdf?MOD=AJPERES (translated from Arabic by DPW), last accessed Apr. 7, 2014.
[12] Arab League, Statement of Signatures and Ratifications of the Arab Charter of Human Rights, http://www.lasportal.org/wps/wcm/connect/498481804a04776ea1d7bd526698d42c/%D8%AC%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%AA%D8%B5%D8%AF%D9%8A%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84+%D8%B9%D9%84%D9%89+%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%8A%D8%AB%D8%A7%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%A8%D9%8A+%D9%84%D8%AD%D9%82%D9%88%D9%82+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A5%D9%86%D8%B3%D8%A7%D9%86.pdf?MOD=AJPERES (translated from Arabic by DPW), last accessed Apr. 7, 2014.
[13] U.N.G.A., 71st Session, Promotion and protection of human rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, paras. 54-71 U.N. Doc. A/71/484/Add.2, Dec. 6, 2016.
[14] U.N.G.A., 71st Session, Promotion and protection of human rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, paras. 54-71 U.N. Doc. A/71/484/Add.2, Dec. 6, 2016.
[15] U.N.G.A., 71st Session, Note Verbale dated 7 September 2017, U.N. Doc. A/71/1047, Sep. 13, 2017.
[16] U.N.G.A., 69th Session, Promotion and Protection of Human Rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, paras. 141, 144, U.N. Doc. A/69/488/Add.2, Dec. 8, 2014.
[17] U.N.G.A., 69th Session, 73rd Plenary Meeting, pp. 17-18, U.N. Doc. A/69/PV.73, Dec. 18, 2014.
[18] U.N.G.A., 69th Session, Note Verbale dated 28 July 2015, U.N. Doc. A/69/993, Jul. 29, 2015.
[19] U.N.G.A., 67th Session, Promotion and Protection of Human Rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, paras. 95-96, U.N. Doc. A/67/457/Add.2, Dec. 8, 2012.
[20] U.N.G.A., 67th Session, 60th Plenary Meeting, pp. 16-17, U.N. Doc. A/67/PV.60, Dec. 20, 2012.
[21] U.N.G.A., 67th Session, Note Verbale dated 16 April 2013, U.N. Doc. A/67/841, Apr. 23, 2013.
[22] U.N.G.A., 65th Session, Promotion and Protection of Human Rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, p.5, U.N. Doc. A/65/456/Add.2, Dec. 8, 2010.
[23] U.N.G.A., 65th Session, 71st Plenary Meeting, pp. 18-19, U.N. Doc. A/65/PV.71, Dec. 21, 2010.
[24] U.N.G.A., 65th Session, Note Verbale dated 11 March 2011, U.N. Doc. A/65/779, Mar. 11, 2011.
[25] U.N.G.A., 63rd Session, Promotion and Protection of Human Rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, U.N. Doc. A/63/430/Add.2, Dec. 4, 2008.
[26] U.N.G.A., 63rd Session, 70th Plenary Meeting, pp. 16-17, U.N. Doc. A/63/PV.70, Dec. 18, 2008.
[27] U.N.G.A., 63rd Session, Note Verbale dated 10 February 2009, U.N. Doc. A/63/716, Feb. 12, 2009.
[28] U.N.G.A., 62nd Session, Promotion and Protection of Human Rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, U.N. Doc. A/62/439/Add.2, Dec. 5, 2007.
[29] U.N.G.A., 62nd Session, 76th Plenary Meeting, pp. 16-17, U.N. Doc. A/62/PV.76, Dec. 18, 2007.
[30] U.N.G.A., 62nd Session, Note Verbale dated 11 January 2008, U.N. Doc. A/62/658, Feb. 2, 2008.

Death Penalty In Law

Does the country’s constitution make reference to capital punishment?

Yes. The Constitution notes that death sentences cannot be carried out until the Council of Ministers presents the sentences, with their commentary, to the King, and the King confirms the death sentences. [1] More generally, the Constitution also notes that the King has the power to grant pardons and remit sentences. [2]

Does the country’s constitution make reference to international law?

The Constitution states that only “ordinary criminals” (as opposed to political refugees, who are not extradited) will be extradited according to international laws and agreements. [3] Article 24 of the Jordanian Civil Code states that in a situation where national and international law are incompatible, national law will not apply and international laws or treaties will take precedence over national legislation. Thus, international conventions ratified by Jordan become an integral part of national law and take precedence over national law. [4] Moreover, a 2003 ruling by the Court of Cassation (Ruling No. 818/2003) holds that international law trumps national law in case of a conflict between the two, and that new national laws may not be passed if they are incompatible with international law. [5] This position may be limited or expansive—while it likely gives supremacy to international human rights treaties, such as the Arab Charter on Human Rights, which have become national law and are published in the Official Gazette. It also applies to any international human rights treaty to which Jordan is a party, particularly the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). We were not able to obtain an official copy of the Court’s decision that would allow us to analyze the scope of the ruling.

Have there been any significant changes in the application of the death penalty over the last several years?

There are signs that Jordan may be gradually restricting its use of the death penalty. No one has been executed in Jordan since 2006, at the request of the King. [6] King Abdullah stated in late 2005 that Jordan “could soon become the first country in the Middle East without capital punishment.” [7]

In 2006 and 2010, Jordan also abolished the death penalty for a number of crimes, including some drug-related offenses, crimes against constitutional authorities through armed rebellion (art. 137(1) of the Penal Code) and arson resulting in death (art. 372 of the Penal Code). [8] However, the original government bill had also included a proposal that the death penalty be abolished for six “national security” crimes, including espionage, treason and terrorism. The latter amendments, however, were not approved.

Jordan abstained from voting on the U.N. General Assembly’s Resolution for a universal moratorium on executions in 2008, 2010 and 2012, in contrast with its ‘No’ vote in 2007. [9] This pattern of abstentions has been noted as a positive development by the Jordanian media. [10]

Nevertheless, there are also signs that the use of the death penalty for certain offenses is firmly entrenched. In 2009, the Jordanian Justice Minister, Ayman Odeh, stated that “this penalty [the death penalty] will still be imposed on premeditated murders.” [11] Moreover, Jordanian courts continue to hand down death sentences with regularity. Between April April 2012 and February 2013, 26 people were sentenced to death, and as of February 2013 there were at least 106 people under sentence of death. [12]

Is there currently an official moratorium on executions within the country?

No. A de facto moratorium seems to be in place. In April 2007, the King of Jordan issued an instruction that executions were on hold until further notice, and no executions have taken place since then. [13] During the Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review in 2009, however, Jordan rejected recommendations by Brazil, Chile and Ireland that it establish an official moratorium as a step toward achieving full abolition. [14] Meanwhile, Jordan continues to hand down death sentences. Between April April 2012 and February 2013, 26 people were sentenced to death, and as of February 2013 there were at least 106 people under sentence of death. [15]

Have there been any significant published cases concerning the death penalty in national courts?

Yes. In 2009, after a retrial, the Court of Cassation decided to commute the death sentence of Muammar Al-Jaghbir to 15 years of hard labor for aiding in the assassination of American diplomat , Laurence Foley in 2002. The other two defendants—a Libyan and Jordanian also convicted in 2004—involved in the assassination were executed in March 2006. [16]

Where can one locate or access judicial decisions regarding the death penalty?

Judicial decisions can be accessed using special software programs within Jordan or online through law firm websites. Some decisions might be posted on the Jordanian Bar Association website (www.jba.org.jo) and the Farraj Law Firm website (www.farrajlawyer.com). [17]

What is the clemency process?

The legislature can issue a “general pardon” which erases the criminality of the act. [18] The King may also issue a personal “special pardon” on the recommendation of the Council of Ministers. The special pardon must include the Council’s recommendation. [19]

Are jury trials provided for defendants charged with capital offenses?

No. [20] Defendants go before a panel of three judges when facing felony charges. [21] Defendants facing charges in the State Security Court (for national security crimes) will go before a panel of judges that includes military judges appointed by the prime minister. [22]

Brief Description of Appellate Process

There is an automatic appeal for defendants facing the death penalty. [23] Criminal murder cases are appealed from the Superior Criminal Court to the Court of Appeals, which convenes a panel of at least three judges. [24] Cases can then be appealed to the Court of Cassation, which convenes a panel of at least five justices. [25] Sentences issued by the State Security Court can also be appealed to the Court of Cassation. [26]

References

[1] The Constitution of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, ch. 4, art. 39, Jan. 1, 1952.
[2] The Constitution of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, ch. 4, art. 38, Jan. 1, 1952.
[3] The Constitution of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, ch. 2, art. 21, Jan. 1. 1952.
[4] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Replies of the government of Jordan to the list of issues to be taken up in connection with consideration of the fourth periodic report of Jordan, art. 2(1) CCPR/C/JOR/Q/4/Add.1, Sept. 16, 2010.
[5] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Replies of the government of Jordan to the list of issues to be taken up in connection with consideration of the fourth periodic report of Jordan, art. 2(2) CCPR/C/JOR/Q/4/Add.1, Sept. 16, 2010; Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Submission to the U.N. Committee Against Torture for its Consideration of the 2nd Periodic Report of Jordan, p. 4, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cat/docs/ngos/RCT_Jordan44.pdf, Apr. 2010.
[6] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 33, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/JOR/3, Mar. 30, 2009.
[7] Amnesty Intl., Death Penalty News: January 2006, p. 8, ACT 53/001/2006, Jan. 1, 2006.
[8] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 32, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/JOR/3, Mar. 30, 2009. Hussam Al-Jaghoub, affiliated with Penal Reform International: Middle East and North Africa Office, email to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 17, 2010; Marwa Buni Hadeel, The trend of abolishing the death penalty in Jordan (Tujih al-gha ‘uquba al-‘idaam fil ordun), http://ainnews.net/78714.html, ‘Ain News, Apr. 14, 2011.
[9] Caroline Sculier, Towards a Universal Moratorium on the Use of the Death Penalty, p. 20, World Coalition Against the Death Penalty, Feb. 2010. U.N.G.A., 65th Session, 71st Plenary Meeting, pp. 18-19, U.N. Doc. A/65/PV.71, Dec. 21, 2010. U.N.G.A., 65th Session, 71st Plenary Meeting, pp. 18-19, U.N. Doc. A/65/PV.71, Dec. 21, 2010. U.N.G.A., 67th Session, 60th Plenary Meeting, pp. 16-17, U.N. Doc. A/67/PV.60, Dec. 20, 2012.
[10] Marwa Buni Hadeel, The trend of abolishing the death penalty in Jordan (Tujih al-gha ‘uquba al-‘idaam fil ordun), http://ainnews.net/78714.html, ‘Ain News, Apr. 14, 2011.
[11] Hani Hazaimeh, Experts propose death penalty annulment in state security cases, http://jordantimes.com/experts-propose-death-penalty-annulment-in-state-security-cases, The Jordan Times, Apr. 6, 2009.
[12] Haitham Shibli, affiliated with Penal Reform International Middle East and North Africa, e-mail to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 27, 2013.
[13] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions in 2011, p. 40,
[14] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 5, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/JOR/3, Mar. 30, 2009.
[15] Haitham Shibli, affiliated with Penal Reform International Middle East and North Africa, e-mail to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 27, 2013.
[16] Mutaz Mustafa Farraj, The Court of Cassation reduces the punishment of defendant Al-Jaghbir from the death penalty to temporary labor, http://www.farrajlawyer.com/viewTopic.php?topicId=724, Nov. 15, 2009; Agence France-Presse, Jordanian death sentence for murder of U.S. diplomat commuted to jail time, http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/Nov/16/Jordanian-death-sentence-for-murder-of-US-diplomat-commuted-to-jail-time.ashx#axzz210oyEWMx, The Daily Star, Nov. 16, 2009.
[17] Hussam Al-Jaghoub, affiliated with Penal Reform International: Middle East and North Africa Office, email to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 17, 2010;
[18] Jordan Penal Code, art. 50, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[19] Jordan Penal Code, art. 51, Law No. 16 of 1960, 1960.
[20] U.S. Dept. of State, 2011 Human Rights Report: Jordan, Trial Procedures, http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/index.htm#wrapper, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[21] Embassy of the United States in Amman, Jordan, Jordan Fact Sheets: Jordanian Legal System, http://jordan.usembassy.gov/acs_jordanian_legal_system.html, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012; see also Programme on Governance in the Arab Region, Structure of the Public Prosecution Office in Jordan, http://www.pogar.org/publications/judiciary/prosecution/structure-jordan.pdf, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[22] Intl. Federation for Human Rights, Abolition of the Death Penalty for Some Crimes Symbolic at Best, http://www.fidh.org/Abolition-of-the-Death-Penalty-for-Some-Crimes, Aug. 16, 2006.
[23] U.S. Dept. of State, 2011 Human Rights Report: Jordan, Trial Procedures, http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/index.htm?dynamic_load_id=186431#wrapper, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[24] Programme on Governance in the Arab Region, Structure of the Public Prosecution Office in Jordan, pp. 4, 5, http://www.pogar.org/publications/judiciary/prosecution/structure-jordan.pdf, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[25] Programme on Governance in the Arab Region, Structure of the Public Prosecution Office in Jordan, p. 4, http://www.pogar.org/publications/judiciary/prosecution/structure-jordan.pdf, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[26] Programme on Governance in the Arab Region, Structure of the Public Prosecution Office in Jordan, p. 6, http://www.pogar.org/publications/judiciary/prosecution/structure-jordan.pdf, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.

Death Penalty In Practice

Where Are Death-Sentenced Prisoners incarcerated?

There is not a separate prison for inmates sentenced to death, who instead are kept in solitary confinement within the larger prison complexes where they are held. [1] Inmates sentenced to death for national security crimes are housed in Juwaida or Swaqa prisons. [2] Women under sentence of death are held in the Women’s Center for Correction and Rehabilitation in Juwaida prison. [3]

Description of Prison Conditions

Prisoners sentenced to death are kept in solitary confinement. [4] The U.S. Department of State has reported that prisoners in Jordan lack adequate food, water, healthcare, sanitation and visitation facilities. [5] Religious and exercise facilities may be lacking, and prison officials may seriously restrict prisoners’ access to books and personal belongings. [6] Allegations of torture and prisoner mistreatment by guards are widespread. [7] Conditions for women were generally better than those for men. Pretrial detainees were often detained with convicted prisoners. [8]

Are there any known foreign nationals currently under sentence of death?

Yes—at least one Iraqi woman. [9] Her name is Sajida Mubarak Al-Rishawi. She was convicted of the 2005 hotel bombings in Amman, Jordan which resulted in 60 deaths. Her husband carried out the suicide attack as she also attempted to detonate explosives but failed. She is said to have links to al-Qaeda in Iraq. She is currently sentenced to death in Jordan. As of 2012, as far as our research shows, she is still in the process of appealing her sentence. [10]

What are the nationalities of the known foreign nationals on death row?

There is at least one Iraqi woman on death row. [11]

Are there any known women currently under sentence of death?

As of February 2013, there were nine women under sentence of death in Jordan. [12]

Are there any reports of individuals currently under sentence of death who may have been under the age of 18 at the time the crime was committed?

No. Jordan does not sentence individuals under 18 to death. [13] By the end of our research, we found no reports of such sentences.

Comments regarding the racial/ethnic composition on death row

We were unable to locate any information on this question by the end of our research.

Are there lawyers available for indigent defendants facing capital trials?

Yes, indigent defendants facing the death penalty or life imprisonment are provided an attorney at the public expense. [14]

Are there lawyers available for indigent prisoners on appeal?

The attorney initially assigned to the defendant will continue to represent him or her on appeal to the Court of Cassation. [15]

Comments on Quality of Legal Representation

There are insufficient numbers of attorneys available to indigent defendants. For instance, in Amman, two NGOs, the Justice Center for Legal Aid and Tamkeen, provide legal representation services. Only 9 lawyers work at JCLA in a city of 6.5 million. However, a public defender program may soon be established, with funding from the European Union and the World Bank. [16]

Other Comments on Criminal Justice System

A person under arrest has the right to have an attorney present during interrogation, but the detainee must appoint a lawyer—and the lawyer must present him- or herself—within 24 hours, or the detainee can be interrogated without an attorney present. [17] The detainee can also be interrogated without an attorney before the 24 hours are up if the police feel it is an especially urgent case or that evidence will be lost. [18] Furthermore, the General Prosecutor can bar defense attorneys from interrogations at his discretion in the interest of speeding up the interrogation or getting at the truth. This decision is not reviewable. In such a case, the defense attorney will have access to the results of the interrogation after the fact. [19]

The International Federation for Human Rights reports that the State Security Court issues a large number of death sentences for crimes relating to national security and terrorism. [20] Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and the International Federation for Human Rights express concern that the confessions that are used to secure convictions and death sentences are extracted under torture. [21] Jordan ratified the U.N. Convention Against Torture in 1991, but has not ratified the Optional Protocol. [22]

References

[1] Human Rights Watch, Torture and Impunity in Jordan’s Prisons, p. 27, http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/jordan1008webwcover.pdf, Oct. 8, 2008.
[2] Human Rights Watch, Torture and Impunity in Jordan’s Prisons, p. 2, http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/jordan1008webwcover.pdf, Oct. 8, 2008.
[3] Human Rights Watch, Honoring the Killers: Justice Denied for "Honor" Crimes in Jordan, http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/412ee9cd4.html, Apr. 20, 2004.
[4] Human Rights Watch, Torture and Impunity in Jordan’s Prisons, p. 27, http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/jordan1008webwcover.pdf, Oct. 8, 2008.
[5] U.S. Dept. of State, 2011 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices – Jordan, http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/4fc75a8ec.html, May 24, 2012.
[6] U.S. Dept. of State, 2011 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices – Jordan, http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/4fc75a8ec.html, May 24, 2012.
[7] U.S. Dept. of State, 2011 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices – Jordan, http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/4fc75a8ec.html, May 24, 2012.
[8] U.S. Dept. of State, 2011 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices – Jordan, http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/4fc75a8ec.html, May 24, 2012.
[9] Hands Off Cain, The Death Penalty Worldwide 2010 Report, p. 50, http://www.eidhr.eu/files/dmfile/the-death-penalty-worldwide-report-2010_en.pdf, Aug. 31, 2010.
[10] The Telegraph, Jordan convicts 10 on terrorism charges, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/jordan/8041659/Jordan-convicts-10-on-terrorism-charges.html, Oct. 4, 2010.
[11] Hands Off Cain, The Death Penalty Worldwide 2010 Report, p. 50, http://www.eidhr.eu/files/dmfile/the-death-penalty-worldwide-report-2010_en.pdf, Aug. 31, 2010.
[12] Haitham Shibli, affiliated with Penal Reform International Middle East and North Africa, e-mail to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 27, 2013.
[13] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 32, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/JOR/3, Mar. 30, 2009.
[14] Jordan Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 208, Law No. 9 of 1961, 1961; U.S. Dept. of State, 2011 Human Rights Report: Jordan, Trial Procedures, http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/index.htm#wrapper, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.
[15] Hussam Al-Jaghoub, affiliated with Penal Reform International: Middle East and North Africa Office, email to DPW, DPW Jordan Doc. E-1, Jun. 17, 2010.
[16] Clare Coughlan, Activists want better legal representation for Jordanians, http://northeasternuniversityjournalism2012.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/activists-want-better-legal-representation-for-jordanians/, May 24, 2012; Laila Azzeh, Jordan moving towards abolishing the death penalty, http://jordantimes.com/jordan-moving-towards-abolishing-the-death-penalty, The Jordan Times, Apr. 14, 2011.
[17] Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Submission to the U.N. Committee Against Torture for its Consideration of the 2nd Periodic Report of Jordan, p. 22, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cat/docs/ngos/RCT_Jordan44.pdf, Apr. 2010.
[18] Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Submission to the U.N. Committee Against Torture for its Consideration of the 2nd Periodic Report of Jordan, p. 31, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cat/docs/ngos/RCT_Jordan44.pdf, Apr. 2010.
[19] Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Submission to the U.N. Committee Against Torture for its Consideration of the 2nd Periodic Report of Jordan, p. 31, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cat/docs/ngos/RCT_Jordan44.pdf, Apr. 2010.
[20] Intl. Federation for Human Rights, Abolition of the Death Penalty for Some Crimes Symbolic at Best, http://www.fidh.org/Abolition-of-the-Death-Penalty-for-Some-Crimes, Aug. 16, 2006.
[21] Amnesty Intl., Jordan: “Your Confessions Are Ready For You to Sign,” p. 4, MDE 16/005/2006, Jul. 23, 2006; Intl. Federation for Human Rights, Abolition of the Death Penalty for Some Crimes Symbolic at Best, http://www.fidh.org/Abolition-of-the-Death-Penalty-for-Some-Crimes, Aug. 16, 2006; Human Rights Watch, Torture and Impunity in Jordan’s Prisons, p. 11, http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/jordan1008webwcover.pdf, Oct. 8, 2008.
[22] Status, Declarations, and Reservations, Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, 1465 U.N.T.S. 85, Dec. 10, 1984, http://treaties.un.org/pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=IND&mtdsg_no=IV-9&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012. Status, Declarations, and Reservations, Optional Prot. to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, U.N. Doc. A/RES/57/199, Dec. 18, 2002, Treaty Body Database, http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-9-b&chapter=4&lang=en, last accessed Jul. 23, 2012.

Decisions of International Human Rights Bodies

Decisions of Human Rights Committee

Following its third periodic review of Jordan in 1994, the Human Rights Committee noted that it was concerned about both the number of offenses punishable by death under Jordanian law and the number of death sentences meted out by the courts. [1] The Committee also recommended that Jordan begin taking measures to abolish the death penalty, and accede to the Second Optional Protocol. [2]

In 2010, the Human Rights Committee recommended in its concluding observations that Jordan accede to the Second Optional Protocol on to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The Committee also commended Jordan’s efforts at establishing a de facto moratorium on the death penalty since 2007. [3]

Decisions of Other Human Rights Bodies

In May 2009, during the UPR process, Jordan rejected recommendations that it establish an official moratorium on executions with a view to abolishing the death penalty. [4]

References

[1] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 8, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/79/Add.35, Aug. 10, 1994.
[2] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, para. 14, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/79/Add.35, Aug. 10, 1994.
[3] U.N. ICCPR Human Rights Committee, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 40 of the Covenant, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/JOR/4, Nov. 18, 2010.
[4] U.N.G.A. Human Rights Council, Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review, paras. 48(d), 50(b), 79(a), 94, U.N. Doc. A/HRC/11/29, May 29, 2009.

Additional Sources and Contacts

Direct member(s) of World Coalition Against the Death Penalty

Adaleh Center for Human Rights Studies
Mr. Miqdad Asem
President
Tla'a Al-Ali, Al-Mawrdi Street, Building No.4
11118-183682 Aman, Jordan
Telephone: + 962 6 5602371/84
Fax: + 962 6 56 03 626
info@adaleh-center.org
www.adaleh-center.org

Adaleh Center for Human Rights Studies
Mrs. Luna Sabbah
Executive Director
Tla'a Al-Ali, Al-Mawrdi Street, Building No.4
11118-183682 Aman, Jordan
Telephone: + 962 6 5602371/84
Fax: + 962 6 56 03 626
luna.sabbah@adaleh-center.org
www.adaleh-center.org

Arab Coalition Against the Death Penalty
Dr. Nizam Assaf
Director of the Amman Center for Human Rights
Al Abdali, Al Sharaf Building, 4th Floor
212524 Aman, Jordan
Telephone: +962 6 46 55 043
Fax: +962 6 46 55 043
achrs@achrs.org
http://dp.achrs.org

Arab Coalition Against the Death Penalty
Dr. Mohammad Al Tarawneh
Coordinator, Judge at Cassation Court
P.O. Box 2362 – 11182 / Khalada
Aman, Jordan
jud_moh88@yahoo.com
http://dp.achrs.org

Penal Reform International (PRI)
Mrs. Taghreed Jaber
8 Ibrahim Khorma Street, Seven Circle
P.O. Box 852122
11185 Aman, Jordan
Tel: +962 6 582 60 17
Fax: +962 6 582 60 78
tjaber@penalreform.org

Other non-governmental organizations and individuals engaged in advocacy surrounding the death penalty

Amman Center for Human Rights Studies
Al Abdali, Al Sharaf Building 4th Floor
P.O. Box 212524
Amman 11121, Jordan
Tel. 00962-6-4655043; 00962-795151590
http://www.achrs.org/english
achrs@achrs.org

The National Centre for Human Rights
P.O. Box 5503; Postal Code 11183
151 Zahran Street, Amman, Jordan
Tel. 00962-6-5932257; 00962-785022022
Toll Free Line: 00962-080022320
http://www.nchr.org.jo
mail@nchr.org.jo

Penal Reform International, Middle East and North Africa Region
Mrs. Taghreed Jaber
Abdoun Post Office
P.O. Box 852122
11185, Amman, Jordan
Tel. 00962-6-5826017
www.penalreform.org
priamman@penalreform.org

Reprieve
PO Box 72054
London EC3P 3BZ
United Kingdom
Tel 020 7553 8140
Fax 020 7553 8189
info@reprieve.org.uk
http://www.reprieve.org.uk

Helpful Reports and Publications

Human Rights Watch’s report “Torture and Impunity in Jordan’s Prisons: Reforms Fail to Tackle Widespread Abuse” is very useful for information on the Jordanian prison system and allegations of torture by police and prison guards. This report was published in October 2008 and is available online at http://www.achrs.org/english/images/stories/reports/arab_inter/jordan1008web.pdf.

The Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims in Copenhagen, Denmark, released submitted its report “To the UN Committee Against Torture for its Consideration of the 2nd Periodic Review of Jordan” in April 2010. This report is very useful for information on the right to legal counsel in Jordan, as well as for English translations for some portions of the Jordanian Penal Code and Military Penal Code. It is available online at http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cat/docs/ngos/RCT_Jordan44.pdf.

For a very lengthy description of the court system in Jordan, see “Structure of the Public Prosecution Office in Jordan” at http://www.pogar.org/publications/judiciary/prosecution/structure-jordan.pdf. This is courtesy of the UNDP’s Programme on Governance in the Arab Region (POGAR).

Amnesty International’s page on The Death Penalty in Middle East and North Africa in 2008 contains a video interview with Dr. Mohammed Al-Tarawneh on the status of the death penalty in Jordan. This can be found at http://www.amnesty.org/en/death-penalty/death-sentences-and-executions-in-2008/mena.

Additional notes regarding this country

None.

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